It should be 100%plagarisam free other wise i want money back


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It should be 100%plagarisam free other wise i want money back 1.For First case 1.5 The written case analysis must be 5-7 pages in length, including APA format and include 6-7 scholarly citations/references 2.For second attachment question final project should be at least 15 pages in length, including APA format. Citations—at least 10 scholarly citations/references per final project CASE 1.5.docx CASE 1.5: The Leslie Fay Companies Paul Polishan graduated with an accounting degree in 1969 and immediately accepted an entry-level position in the accounting department of The Leslie Fay Companies, a women’s apparel manufacturer based in New York City. Fred Pomerantz, Leslie Fay’s founder, personally hired Polishan. Company insiders recall that Pomerantz saw in the young accounting graduate many of the same traits that he possessed. Both men were ambitious, hard driving, and impetuous by nature. After joining Leslie Fay, Polishan quickly struck up a relationship with John Pomerantz, the son of the company’s founder. John had joined the company in 1960 after earning an economics degree from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1972, the younger Pomerantz became Leslie Fay’s president and assumed responsibility for the company’s day-to-day operations. Over the next few years, Polishan would become one of John Pomerantz’s most trusted allies within the company. Polishan quickly rose through the ranks of Leslie Fay, eventually becoming the company’s chief financial officer (CFO) and senior vice president of finance. Leslie Fay’s corporate headquarters were located in the heart of Manhattan’s bustling garment district. The company’s accounting offices, however, were 100 miles to the northwest in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. During Polishan’s tenure as Leslie Fay’s top accounting and finance officer, the Wilkes-Barre location was tagged with the nickname “Poliworld.” The strict and autocratic Polishan ruled the Wilkes-Barre site with an iron fist. When closing the books at the end of an accounting period, Polishan often required his subordinates to put in 16-hour shifts and to work through the weekend. Arriving two minutes late for work exposed Poliworld inhabitants to a scathing reprimand from the CFO. To make certain that his employees understood what he expected of them, Polishan posted a list of rules within the Wilkes-Barre offices that documented their rights and privileges in minute detail. For example, they had the right to place one, and only one, family photo on their desks. Even Leslie Fay personnel in the company’s Manhattan headquarters had to cope with Polishan’s domineering manner. When senior managers in the headquarters office requested financial information from Wilkes-Barre, Polishan often sent them a note demanding to know why they needed the information. Polishan’s top lieutenant at the Wilkes-Barre site was the company controller, Donald Kenia. On Polishan’s frequent trips to Manhattan, Kenia assumed control of the accounting offices. Unlike his boss, Kenia was a soft-spoken individual who enjoyed following orders much more than giving them. Because of Kenia’s meek personality, friends and coworkers were stunned in early February 1993 when he took full responsibility for a large accounting fraud revealed to the press by John Pomerantz. Investigators subsequently determined that Leslie Fay’s earnings had been overstated by approximately $80 million from 1990 through 1992. Following the public disclosure of the large fraud, John Pomerantz repeatedly and adamantly insisted that he and the other top executives of Leslie Fay, including Paul Polishan, had been unaware of the massive accounting irregularities perpetrated by Kenia. Nevertheless, many parties inside and outside the company expressed doubts regarding Pomerantz’s indignant denials. Kenia was not a major stockholder and did not have an incentive-based compensation contract tied to the company’s earnings, m

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