Case Study Analysis Write an eight- to ten-page case analysis of


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Case Study Analysis Write an eight- to ten-page case analysis of the following article (which can be found in the Ashford Online ProQuest database): • Souza, M. & McCarty, B. (2007). From bottom to top: How one provider retooled its collections [Electronic version]. Healthcare Financial Management, 61(9), 67-73. Include the following: • Complete summary of the case study that identifies the key problems and issues, provides background information, relevant facts, the solution employed, and the results achieved. • Identify and explain the accounting practices California Sutter Health used in defining and solving its collection problems. • Develop an alternative solution based on your own research using three to five academic sources from journals, professional organizations, and websites. • State your informed opinion of the approach used by California Sutter Health, and provide support using concepts from your research and personal experience. Writing the Final Paper The Final Paper: 1. Must be eight to ten double-spaced pages in length, not including the title page and reference page, and formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center. 2. Must include a title page with the following: a. Title of Case Study b. Student’s name c. Course name and number d. Instructor’s name e. Date submitted 3. Must begin with an introductory paragraph that has a succinct thesis statement. 4. Must address the topic of the paper with critical thought. 5. Must use a visual such as a chart, table, graph, or other that relates to something you have learned in the class and is relevant to the case. 6. Must end with a conclusion that reaffirms your thesis. 7. Must use at least three scholarly sources. 8. Must document all sources in APA style, as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center. 9. Must include a separate reference page, formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center. Sutter Health, one of Northern California’s largest providers, is committed to giving its patient financial services (PFS) staff on both the front and back ends the tools they need to improve patient collections and thus the system’s bottom line. Having started in 2006 with the patient account representatives, collectors, and other members of the central business office of its Sacramento/Sierra region, the health system is working its way forward to the registration staff, ultimately aiming to transfer many of the back-end functions to the front end and make point-of-service collection the norm. In the first three months of the project, Sutter reduced accounts receivable (A/R days) for the nine hospitals in the region from 65 to 59. Given that each one of those days equals $13 million, that means the health system collected an additional $78 million. Sutter’s strategy for increasing collections and reducing A/R days focused on empowering individual PFS staff members to assume responsibility for each account they deal with. Full Text • Translate Full textTranslate • Headnote How should a hospital go about increasing its upfront collections from self- pay patients? California’s Sutter Health has found an effective way to accomplish this goal. We all know the mantra, “no margin, no mission.” One increasingly important strategy for optimizing margins in this time of high- deductible health plans and higher copayments is to collect more cash from patients, including self- pay patients. Much has been made of the fact that nearly 47 million Americans are uninsured, but it’s an erroneous assumption that none of these people can afford to pay for their health care. More than 80 percent of uninsured people come from working families, and many may have the resources to pay for some or all of their health care- if only someone would ask them to. That “someone” is the patient financial services (PFS) staff member. To frame the question in a way that will elicit the most positive response, PFS staff need complete, accurate, an…

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